Saturday, October 11, 2014

Stop and clear!

It was by chance that I stumbled upon the last couple of packets of instant yoghurt powder (bought from Woolworths Morley). I knew that I can't leave it to rot in the cabinet for the next occupant to clear; that'd be mean and a waste of food.



In a pot of lukewarm water, stir in the powder.







Strain into a rectangle-shaped container (like the one illustrated in the succeeding picture).



Leave in the warmest area of the house (it's usually the kitchen, but it can be the living room at times) for around 12 hours or squiggly. (I made the error of leaving it unrefrigerated for 18 hours and the batch that I made smelt like it was fermented.)



Refrigerate for at least 8 hours or until firm.



Enjoy!! (I topped mine with almonds since it's been barely used.)



P.S.S. Since Mama Carrie had bought the yoghurt maker from a MLM company years ago, I usually make use of that item whenever I want to eat the homemade version; it's somehow easier. But it's been packed away for my future use in Australia, forcing me to make do with whatever I have.

8 comments:

  1. I've tried a couple of times to make my own yoghurt but have not been very pleased with my results.

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    Replies
    1. I feel you, Yum List.

      I always get disastrous results whenever I try to make yoghurt without the electric maker. =(

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  2. This is the first time I see an instant yogurt powder !!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's getting pretty common in KL nowadays with most of the grocery stores stocking it - or at least the ones that I frequently patronize. =D I won't say it's convenient, but for someone who loves yoghurt, I don't mind waiting for it to do its work. ^^

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  3. OMG that looks sooooo good! How's the instant Greek yoghurt powder? I've always wanted to try them instead of using starter cultures, but never got around to doing it!

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    Replies
    1. Eh, thanks, HB. I've used both - starter cultures and instant yoghurt powder - with similar results except that the former seems to carry a milkier taste to the texture.

      I don't know if it's only me, but do give it a shot with the latter. It's quite "fragile"; just be careful of the timing and the temperature of the water and you'll be fine. =) One wrong move would interfere with its work and send it fermenting instead or "cook" the good bacteria in it. =(

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  4. gosh, i don't go grocery shopping enough ... i never knew yoghurt powder existed! well thanks for teaching me something new :D

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