Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Life goes on

Before I start today’s post, I’ll have to extend my thanks to all of the law students who emerged from their hiding places to cast their ballots for the recent LSS elections. Regardless of the candidates you’ve chosen, you knew that to get your voice across the table to the representatives, you had to vote. This is an important principle of democracy.

To my campaigners and fellow candidates, it’s been an awesome time working with all of you! Although we weren’t accorded the opportunity to bring our plans to fruition and celebrate our success with a bang, I’m sure we’ll be able to cross paths or even catch up with each other somehow.

To the winning team, congratulations on your success! It’s been a hard-won fight. I wish you all the best in making law school better - not only for studies, but also a place where students can bask in each other’s company in between tutes.

Now that the elections are done and dusted, it’s time to focus on the exam revision for Administrative Law and complete the essays that I’ve left on the backburner. Let me tell you, concurrently juggling between 3 different citation methods ain’t fun. Maybe I’ll give you the context so that you’ll be able to get the drift: I almost cited a sentence from my World History textbook for my Canadian Law essay in the APA format when it should be in footnotes.

“To accomplish much you must first lose everything - Che Guevara”

It was during our hourly break that my eyes landed on this quote hanging from a portrait outside our tutorial room. I was instantly attracted to it because it spoke volumes. Not to mention, success always come with a sacrifice - whether at an emotional or psychological level. An example of this could be the pursuance of studies abroad. I’m not going to name names. I know a former friend who desired to stay back in the home country to study, but the family insisted that he fly half a world away to pursue his degree. Another example would be arriving at the decision to do something (read: opting to swap arts electives for Criminal Law) at the expense of something else (read: the expedience of more stress).

Can I say that Che Guevara’s words can be applied to our campaign team’s defeat? Yes and no. It’s not that we didn’t play hard - heck, one of us even went to extreme lengths to introduce the dinosaur mascot under the baking sun. If it hadn’t been for the wind and extreme heat, trust me, I’d have lost the hoodie and turn up in a shorter dress… with full make-up. It’s a fact that we need to learn from the mistakes we made and approach the campaign, should all of us are interested in participating next year, from a different viewpoint. I admit, we definitely failed to engage the students and understanding their thinking and what they desire during their time in law, even if it means compromising on some policies. Most law students are enthusiastic about the after exam parties or the exquisite Law Ball, but we could’ve factored in those students (like myself) who wouldn’t willingly attend those events. Kinda ironic, huh? I campaigned for the Activities Representatives and love planning activities (such as Law Ball) yet would never be present in all of the events, lol.

Most of my friends - and some in law school - were disappointed that we didn’t win because they know what I’ll be able to bring to the table. Here’s the catch; my position on the hierarchy wouldn’t allow me to succeed based on popularity alone. To add salt to my little wound, it’s more of the connection and less on the policies that will secure the votes. I guess that answered my nonchalence towards the defeat. I arrived for the 2nd day of campaigning with the weird feeling that we better be prepared for our loss, but what I didn’t expect was the large difference in tallies.

Hey, there’s always next year - if I’m in the physical and emotional state to have a second shot at campaign again.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...